Bio

Dante Migone-Ojeda is an American artist born in Carbondale, Illinois. Trained as a printmaker, Migone-Ojeda also works extensively in photography, new media, and sculpture. He attended the Sam Fox School of De­sign & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis and received his BFA in Printmaking as well as his BA in Physics in May of 2016. His work is driven by navigating the identities of a Latinx American living and making in middle America. It is centered around the possibility of an alternative narrative in understanding the American identity, as well as his own, through the use of Guattari and Deleuze’s groundbreaking social theory of assemblage. By positing that identity is constructed through juxtapositions, both literal and figurative, Migone-Ojeda’s work forces identity to be considered as a universally connected construct that can only truly be defined at the individual level, simultaneously global and personal. Dante Migone-Ojeda has had his work featured in a variety of group shows in the St. Louis region, including E(r)go: A Pop-Up Show; Surfaces for Rent: BFA Show 2016; and Find Us Next Year. The list of his awards spans across several disciplines, and includes the Annika Rodriguez Scholarship for full tuition to Washington University; the Belle Cramer Award in Printmaking; runner-up for the John T. Milliken Foreign Travel Scholarship; the Bunny Burson Scholarship Award; and the Morris M. Horwitz Award in Photography. He was also chosen as the Undergraduate Speaker for the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts Recognition Ceremony for graduating students. His professional background includes both the arts and sciences. A commissioned artist for the University City Sculpture series, Migone-Ojeda has installed and maintained a public sculpture in St. Louis, MO. In 2016, he accepted an artist in residence program at the Arquetopia Foundation in Puebla, Mexico. He has also worked in research laboratories, such as the biophysics laboratory of Dr. Carlos Bustamante at the University of California, Berkeley, and the condensed matter physics laboratory of Saikat Talapatra at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He has also worked at the Art Institute of Chicago, and has extensive experience as both a maker and an art educator.